Sex During Pregnancy – The Facts On Enjoying Sex

Now that you’re pregnant, the biggest question for many women is whether to continue having sex during pregnancy.

Most expectant parents worry whether sex during pregnancy will harm the baby or cause discomfort, pain or even miscarriage.

These worries are completely normal and while you continue to have a normal pregnancy, are usually unfounded.

If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, here a few hints to ensure you can continue to enjoy a happy, healthy sex life during pregnancy.

Sex During Pregnancy – is it safe?

If you are having a normal pregnancy, then sex during pregnancy is considered safe.

If you are considered high risk for complications such as pre-term labor or miscarriage, then you should discuss your concerns about sex during pregnancy with your health care provider.

Having gentle, loving sex will not harm your baby in any way.

Sex During Pregnancy – Satisfying the need for intimacy

Honest and open communication between you and your partner will be the key to a satisfying and safe sexual relationship during pregnancy.

Many pregnant women experience fluctuations in their desire for sex during pregnancy. Some will have no desire at all, while others will feel an increase in sexual desire.

For some, symptoms of nausea, fatigue, breast tenderness, and the increased need to urinate, make sex too much of a ‘chore’ particularly during the first trimester.

During the second trimester, when most of these symptoms subside, some women find their desire for sex increases.

During the third trimester the desire for sex can subside as the uterus grows larger and the reality of what’s about to happen sets in.

Your partner may also experience fluctuations in sexual desire. Some men feel closer to their pregnant partner enjoying the changes in her body.

While others find it difficult reconciling the identity of sexual partner with expectant mother.

Just as you do, your partner may also have anxiety about the burdens of parenthood, or concerns about the health of both the mother and their unborn child.

Sex During Pregnancy – When It’s Not Safe?

If engaging in oral sex, your partner should never blow air into your vagina. Blowing air can cause an air embolism – a blockage of a blood vessel by an air bubble.

This could be potentially fatal for mother and child.

If you are having sex with a new partner, ensure you know their sexual history. If you become infected by a sexually transmitted disease this could be transmitted to your baby.

Sex During Pregnancy – Making the most of it!

As long as the desire is there, there are many ways to satisfy both your needs for intimacy.

Learning how to please each other with or without penetration can actually improve a couple’s sex life.

Oral sex, kissing, caressing, and experimenting with other positions can keep sex comfortable and exciting.

As your pregnancy progresses, experiment with these positions to find the most comfortable.

o Lie partly sideways – this allows your partner to keep most of his weight off your uterus

o Lie on your back at the side of the bed with your knees bent, and your bottom and feet perched at the edge of the mattress. Your partner can either kneel or stand in front of you.

o Lie side by side in the spoon position – this allows for shallow penetration

o You go on top – this puts no weight on your abdomen and allows you to control the depth of penetration
o Sit on your partner’s lap as he sits on a sturdy chair

As you come closer to birth – precuations to take

Avoid lying flat on your back during sex, particularly after the fourth month. If your uterus compresses the veins in the back of your abdomen, you may feel lightheaded or nauseous.

Some doctors recommend you stop having sex during pregnancy in the final weeks as a safety precaution because semen contains a chemical that may actually stimulate contractions.

This need only be a concern if you are near or past your due date.

Sex during pregnancy should be enjoyed as once your baby is born, exhaustion, privacy issues and lack of time may well take the choice out of your hands.

Apart from the intimacy of sex during pregnancy, there are additional benefits as well. Sex releases endorphins, relaxes muscles and helps you sleep.

Sex Life During Pregnancy Can Still Be Good

It’s not unusual for a woman to feel ashamed to talk about having sex during pregnancy, with her doctor or friends. Having sexual intimacy and being pregnant shouldn’t make any woman feel unnatural. In order to help you discover more about this sensitive topic, we’ve put together some fundamental answers to commonly asked questions about sexual intercourse and pregnancy.

Let’s cover the matter that all woman having their first newborn would like the answer to. Is sexual intimacy during maternity harmless?

For most women who experience a common pregnancy, free of complications, having sex during this time is completely safe. First of all, the baby is safe by the amniotic sac. The amniotic sac grows and starts to fill, mainly with water, around two weeks after fertilization. The mucus plug actually seals the cervix. In fact, if there are no medical reasons or abnormal problems, you can continue to have sexual intimacy right up until your water breaks. It may not be harmless to have sex when there are any abnormal problems present already, that will adversely affect the baby. A dilated cervix, placenta previa, cervical insufficiency, vaginal bleeding, emission, early labour, or abdominal cramping may all be reasons why a doctor would advise against sex during pregnancy. If you’re unsure about whether or not you can have sexual relations during your pregnancy, just ask your health care provider, nurse or midwife.

Is There Any Type Of Sex I Should Avoid During Pregnancy?

Unless you’ve been told by your personal doctor or midwife that you should avoid sex, you can probably continue your sexual intercourse life normally. There are a couple noteworthy exceptions. The first exclusion would apply if you agree to oral sex from your partner. Tell him not to blow into your vagina. The damaging effect to you or your baby could be an air embolism. This could affect you or just your baby. The other understandable reason of concern is unprotected sexual intimacy with a partner you are not certain, is free from sexually transmitted infections. If you’re not sure your partner has no STIs, then you should always use a condom or abstain from sexual acts altogether. STDs can affect you and your baby, so having sex during pregnancy is too risky to take a chance.

Does Having A Complication Mean Absolutely No sexual relations During Pregnancy?

First off, by no means be afraid to confront your doctor about this question. If you’ve been told that you should refrain from sexual intimacy during pregnancy, ask him to be more specific. Is it really necessary? Does it encompass all intimate acts? Is the health care provider talking about sexual intimacy or just about the effect of an orgasm? Discovering accurately what is allowed and not allowed, will help you feel more relaxed about sex, while you’re pregnant.

Will My Desire For Sex Change During Pregnancy?

Your sex drive may change during pregnancy. Nausea, fatigue and being uncomfortable will unquestionably reduce your desire for sex. Many times though, there’s a feeling of total freedom and a renewed intimacy since there is no worry about getting pregnant anymore. At the same time, your partner’s sex drive may be increasing or decreasing by the pregnancy, so be sure to communicate effectively with him about how you both feel.

Will Different Positions Make Sex More Comfortable For Me During Pregnancy?

Changing sex positions can make you more comfortable during pregnancy. The position of sexual intercourse that was comfortable before pregnancy, is many times no longer comfy while being pregnant. Sometimes a woman never really finds the position where they’re really well-situated, and prefers to have sex by manual stimulation or oral sex.

Will sexual intercourse Feel Different For Me During Pregnancy?

Sex may feel different for you when you’re pregnant. It may feel much better than normal or much less comfortable than before you were pregnant. Another change that you’ll notice, is, your breasts and genitals may become enlarged and more sensitive than before you were pregnant. For some women this leads to a much more pleasurable sensation during sex, but others may experience being more uncomfortable. If you are no longer enjoying sexual intercourse, experiment with your mate to find new ways to love each other.

Is There A Time Up To, That I Can proceed To Have Sex During A Pregnancy?

If you have no pre-existing stipulation and nothing your doctor has restricted you from sexual relations about, there is no reason not to have sex until your water breaks. Having sexual intercourse, that leads to having an orgasm, can often bring on labour. So feel free to have a lot of sexual intimacy with your spouse, right up to the time you have your baby.

Sex during pregnancy can be an embarrassing topic for some women, but there’s no reason to ever feel shameful about finding out how to protect yourself, your baby, and your partner during this time. For more information about your sex life during pregnancy talk to your GP, midwife or contact a branch of the National Childbirth Trust.

The Turkish ‘Kinsey Report’, Part 3 – First Time Sex

Turkish Sexuality Survey Question —
How would you describe your first sexual experience?

As Metin Üstündag was saying in Part 2…

Until recently, Turkish kids got their sex education in a very haphazard manner — with mostly bad results. My generation was luckier, in some ways — because of what happened in the mid-1970’s in Yesilcam (Turkey’s Hollywood-like film capital located in Istanbul).

The Turkish Erotic Films industry was born (and thrived) during that time and it provided my generation with a sex education, of sorts — though it fell well short of being authoritative. What could we expect? In the role of our sex educator was a porn star, Aydemir Akbas (now a legitimate actor at age 70, who has more than 95 films to his credit). And when he’d leer sexily at the women in those early films, they’d immediately begin to moan with exaggerated desire. In fact, those films probably did more to a develop our sense of humor about sex, than they did to educate us about its ‘finer points’.

Headlines from the sexuality survey…

  • 6 of 10 virgin couples felt ‘excitement’ at the thought of their first sexual congress as partners.
  • 23% of those surveyed felt ‘lust’ during their first sexual experience. The second most mentioned feeling was ‘nervousness’ — noted by 10.6% of participants.
  • Of those citing a feeling of ‘lust’ during their first sexual experience, most were aged 16-34
  • Men (6.2%) more than women (4.9%) described their first sexual experiences as ‘fatiguing’.
  • Slightly more women (9.9%) than men (8.8%) described their first sexual experience with ‘repugnance, guilt, or anger.’ And…
  • Of the more educated women in the survey, one-third of High School finishers and an equal percentage of University graduates were definite in describing their first sexual experiences as ‘unpleasant’, even ‘bad’. But…
  • Men and women equally (6.8%) said their first sexual experience made them “feel safe and secure.”
  • The 4 most-favored places for first-time sex were:

    1) One’s own home (Male – 43%, Female – 82% )

    2) Someone else’s home (M – 18%, F – 7% )

    3) A hotel (M – 9%, F – 3% )

    4) A brothel (M – 20%, F – 0% )

  • First-time sex-partners fell into three main categories:

    1) Husband/wife (Male – 25%, Female – 81% )

    2) Boyfriend/girlfriend (M – 27%, F – 13% )

    3) Prostitutes (M – 27%, F – 0% )

  • Among the celebrities polled, we were drawn to the ‘first time sex’ observations of the full-blooded veteran-actress Müjde Ar and the multi-talented Hülya Avsar…

    Film and TV Actress Müjde Ar

    It’s probably not fair to generalize about men. And, I don’t believe that every pubescent child rings at the door of a brothel — though life is faster and bolder in the big cities these days. As for the subject of the first sexual experience, in my opinion, a man’s greatest fear…is that his nervousness will show!

    All-round Entertainer Hülya Avsar

    I didn’t feel any nervousness, I felt excitement. That’s got much to do with the partner you’re with — and how the man makes you feel. I didn’t suffer a bit at the crucial moment. Afterwards, I had to hear it from him that I was no longer a virgin.

    In Part 4: More headlines from the Turkish ‘Kinsey Report’ — and answers to the Sexuality Survey Question, ‘How old were you when you had your first sexual relationship?

    Click following to access a fully illustrated HTML version of Turkish Sexuality Survey — First Time Sex